Watly Will Be Next?

Watly Will Be Next?

It is reported that in sub-Saharan Africa, roughly 39 percent of the population does not have access to clean water. Moreover, almost 600 million people live without electricity. Can you imagine life without clean water or electricity?

Watly, a Spanish-Italian start-up company, created what is called, “The Watly Machine.” This device can treat water, generate energy and provide internet access. The first prototype of The Watly was tested in Ghana, and the next set of machines will be distributed all over Africa, beginning with Nigeria and Sudan.

The Watly has three major service components: electricity, water treatment and Wi-Fi. Solar panels are what make these processes possible, converting solar energy into electricity. The water treatment component is a two-step process. First, water is passed through a graphene-based filter. According to scientists, graphene is hydrophobic. This means it repels water, but when it is perforated with small holes, it allows water to pass through, filtering contaminants. After it flows through graphene filters, the water is boiled and distilled. As for Wi-Fi, the solar-generated energy allows for anyone to have access within an 800-meter radius. The Watly also includes a charging station.

With rural, sub-Saharan Africa as the pilot region, some believe The Watly might have the ability to affect other countries.

By Kimberly Dallmann, ESG Writer

Advertisements

Energy Bill Rocks NRDC

The National Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) are coming together to work out issues regarding a broad energy efficiency bill put out by the U.S. Senate, according to NRDC blogger, Kit Kennedy. This energy bill seeks to save money and decrease energy waste. While it could be beneficial, the NRDC thinks it could further damage the environment.

Since 1970, the NRDC has been committed to ensuring that all people have equal rights to water, air, and the wild. For now, the NRDC does not oppose the bill but cannot fully support it until improvements are made. The NRDC and NAM will work together to eliminate the anti-environmental practices illustrated in the bill.

blog-image-042816.jpg

Marc Boom, NRDC blogger, notes that one part of the bill continues research that requires a harmful technique in order to extract methane hydrates. Another part completely dismisses a study that compiles data to determine carbon emissions from forest biomass.

With plans to expand clean energy and increase funding for renewable energy, this is the first energy bill passed in nearly a decade. The NRDC and NAM will strategize and come to an agreement on how energy can be saved without further damaging the environment.

By Kimberly Dallmann, ESG Writer